Walk? All the way to the corner? Are you completely mad? It’s so far, we’ll take the bike…

THIS IS A TRANSLATED AND UPDATED VERSION OF THIS SWEDISH POST!

 

About a month ago I started the strangest thing. I wanted to walk to school – I know, a half hour walk in slow pace, I must be ready for the mental institution! Thai people rarely walk anywhere. If only to cross the street, they still take their bikes. Obviously I’m speaking about all of those OWNING a bike, who also happen to have realised it is quite the invention. There are plenty of those who don’t own a bike, too, and walk everywhere.

 

Ching, ching raa?”

 

My fiancee Oh is one of those who happen to believe the bike is a magical invention, to be used everyday and for everything, even the smallest and most menial task. When I first aired my idea about walking to and from school I received the weirdest look from him. He thought it sounded extremely odd. “What? Really? Why?” he asked or rather “Ching, ching raa?” which is Thai for more or less the same thing, but can be used in any conversation and for everything and is rather more of a statement than a question, really.

 

I need to get my fat moving, I’m in too bad of a shape to be healthy in my age.

 

I know I’m lazy, I want to move around more, I need to, and I’m trying to find small, easy tricks in my daily life to let me. I can’t deal with anything as active as actually working out. Besides there’s always one or the other of my ailments stopping me from having a more active life. So I’m trying to sneak in some exercise here and there, and hoping that neither the back of my neck nor my head will notice.

 

So I stood firm, simply because I thought I needed this. That’s also why we chose to live closer to the school, so Oh didn’t have to drive me back and forth all the time. Now I can easily hitch a ride with Malin because I’m living just in between her and the school, so she has to pass by my home in order to get to school, but nooo, I have to start exercising in some manner. But jeeez, getting into this discussion every time I’m going to buy water (or whatever) 30 meters away from home. “Better I drive you”. Well, after a while you kind of give up, and now I’m too starting to think it better he drives me. It’s so far. 😉

 

The first time Malin was going to pick me up Oh was very persistant he should drive me those 200 metres to our meeting spot.

 

He had to give up, as usual, and let me walk.

 

Oh just sighed; such crazy impulse the farang had come up with now, and I bet he thought it easier to let me walk at least once and after that I’d probably don’t want to walk again. It was so far, so it didn’t at all make sense walking over there.

 

The children learn to drive a bike really early in life and in the countryside it’s not unusual to find a 7-year old swish by you, wind in their hair and flapping cheeks.

 

7-year old children learn to drive a bike, about the same time as we back home start to ride the bicycle more and more on our own. Here, they hardly even know what a bicycle is, and I see people ride a bicycle as seldom in Thailand as I see them often in Sweden. You got that one? 😉 I mean the times I’ve seen someone ride a bicycle here, or seen a bicycle at all, are pretty easily counted on one hand, and I have been here for a while now. 🙂

 

I’ve come to the conclusion Thai people don’t like bicycles (do the actually KNOW how to ride the bicycle?), and that conclusion was strengthened when my Thai friends stared at me incredulously when I was asking where I could buy a bicycle.

 

Considering that bicycles turned out to be quite expensive in this country I didn’t buy one. Feels incredibly unnecessary to buy something I have to make an effort riding when I could just as easily or much for the same price buy something which gets me from a to b without the slightest bit of effort. At least this is how a lazy person, such as myself, is thinking, and spending a little more time in this country I’ll probably jump up the bike wave myself – completely!

 

Are Thai people really lazy or just comfortable? 

 

I heard a comment the other day that Thai people are lazy. I’ve never before considered this people to be lazy, on the contrary they are extremely hard working, never complain about anything, only working quietly – day in day out, they pretty much do as they’re told, bowing and saying yes, sir to most things.

But maybe they are lazy. For real. To take the bike, all the time, wherever they’re going regardless of the distance being 1 meter or 50 km – that’s actually being both stupid and lazy.

 

No, I got 2 legs because I should use them for walking, not because I was supposed to straddle a bike! Or anything else for that matter!!

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